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ICYD Results Framework


Iowa Youth Development Results Framework

All youth have the benefit of safe and supportive families...schools...communities. All youth are healthy and socially competent. All youth are successful in school. All youth are prepared for a productive adulthood.
RECOMMENDED LEADING INDICATORS

Rate of founded child neglect and abuse

Family Support

Family Boundaries

Safe Schools

Positive Peer Norms

Supportive school staff and climate

Suspensions and Expulsions

Poverty Rate

Employment Rate

Adult Arrest Rate

Neighborhood Safety

Supportive Neighborhoods

Juvenile Court Referrals for Delinquency

Alcohol Use by Youth

Suicide Risk Avoidance

Violent or Aggressive Behavior

Proficiency Rates

Attendance Rate

Drop out Rate

Commitment to School & Learning

Graduation Rate

Teen Birth Rate

Youth Employment

Youth (16-19) not in school & not working

The above results, including the data indicators, baseline data, and data sources organized for the Learning Supports initiative can be downloaded into a printable pdf file.

About the Iowa Youth Development Results Framework
The Iowa Collaboration for Youth Development has used several prominent youth development models and research to create a results framework for youth development in Iowa. The Iowa youth development framework identifies four broad result areas, designed to be used across State departments and agencies and at both the state and community levels to guide youth policy, organize planning activities and monitor youth development outcomes.

Primary and Secondary Sources for Local, State and National Level Data
The following sites are excellent sources of multiple indicators that may be helpful to community planners and youth development organizations. We've provided a brief description of each of these sources and a link to their page. You can also view a list of the indicators each of these sources tracks here to determine if they have the data you're looking for.

Iowa Youth Survey
The 2008 Iowa Youth Survey was conducted by the Iowa Consortium for Substance Abuse Research and Evaluation. More than 100,000 students in the 6th, 8th, and 11th grades across the state of Iowa answered questions about their attitudes and experiences regarding substance abuse and violence, and their perceptions of their peer, family, school, and neighborhood/community environments.

Iowa Kids Count
The Iowa Kids County Initiative annually updates and disseminates statewide and county-level trend data on eitht key indicators of well-being for Iowa children, ranging from health to education to welfare. The most recent report contains data available from the 2000 Census on population trends by race and ethnicity and on family compostition. The report also provides county-by-county data for a full twenty years on six key indicators of child well-being, along with county data from 1980 to 2000 on population and family characteristics.

Office of Social and Economic Trend Analysis (SETA)
(formerly ISU Census Services)

Census Services complies, analyzes, and distributes information about Iowa's population, housing, agriculture, business, industry, and government. Iowa Counties has county-level data on numerous indicators, and is a major secondary data source for community planners and youth serving organizations.

Uniform Crime Reports
The Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Program is the primary means of collecting data on crimes and arrests in the United States. The Iowa Department of Public Safety is the repository for data on crimes reported to all law enforcement agencies within the State of Iowa. Law enforcement agencies from local jurisdictions submit data on crimes reported to them and arrests they make. County-level data and by most local (city, town) law enforcement jurisdictions on types of crime and arrests is available up to 2004. Information is available on both adult and juvenile arrests.

National Youth Data Sources

Several sources of nationally collected or compiled data are available that provide important information on indicators for youth development. We've summarized some of the most useful sources for national data about youth here. In addition to being good sources of information for state level comparisons, many of these sites also contain or link to state and county level data.

Monitoring the Future
Monitoring the Future is an ongoing study of the behaviors, attitudes, and values of American secondary school students, college students, and young adults, conducted at the Survey Research Center in the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan.

Trends in the Well-being of America's Children and Youth
An annual report from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) on trends in the well-being of our nation's children and youth. The report presents the most recent estimates on more than 90 indicators of child and youth well being. Excellent source for national comparison data.

Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS)
The Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS) monitors six categories of priority health-risk behaviors among youth and young adults, including alcohol, tobacco and other drug use and sexual behaviors, among others.

Youth Tobacco Surveillance - United States 2000
The Youth Tobacco Surveillance and Evaluation System was developed by the CDC and included national and state school-based surveys of middle school and high school students. This report summarizes data from the 2000 national survey and state surveys.

National KIDS COUNT Data Book - 2003
Maintained by the Annie E. Casey Foundation, the annual Kids Count Data Book presents a broad array of indicators of child well being; population change; economic characteristics; child health and education; child care; juvenile justice; and access to phones, computers and the Internet. State profiles and rankings are included.

Childstats
This web site offers easy access to federal and state statistics and reports on children and their families, including: population and family characteristics, economic security, health, behavior and social environment, and education.

FedStats
FedStats provides the full range of official statistical information available to the public from the Federal Government. The site allows access to official statistics collected and published by more than 70 Federal agencies. State and county level data can also be accessed from this site.


Iowa Youth Development Results Framework Indicators

Youth are Successful in School

1. Proficiency Rates

Percent of 8th Grade
Students Proficient in...
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
Reading
70.6%
71.4%
72.3%
72.5%
72.8%
Math
73.8%
74.8%
75.5%
75.9%
76.0%

Source: Iowa Testing Programs, University of Iowa; Annual Condition of Education Report

2. Average Daily Attendance Rate

1999
2005
2006
2007
2008

2009

K-8 Grade
95.8%
95.8%
95.83%
95.72%

Source: Iowa Testing Programs, University of Iowa; Annual Condition of Education Report

3. High School Drop Out Rate

2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
Grades 7- 12
1.44
1.46
1.57
1.96

Source: Iowa Department of Education, Basic Educational Data Survey, Annual Condition of Education Report

4. Graduation Rate

2005 2006
2007
2008
2009  
Graduation Rates as a Percent of Public School Students
90.7%
90.8%
90.5%
88.7%
 

Source: Iowa Department of Education, Basic Educational Data Survey, Annual Condition of Education Report

5. Connected to School and Learning

Percent of youth connected to
school/learning
6th
8th
11th
Weighted
1999
88%
71.5%
62%
73%
2002 89.3% 74.1% 63% 75%
2005 90% 76% 65.5%  
2008 89% 75% 68% 77%

Source: Iowa Department of Public Health, 1999, 2002, 2005, and 2008 Iowa Youth Survey Trend Report

All Youth are Healthy and Socially Competent

1. Juvenile Court Complaints

2004
2005
2006 2007 2008 2009
Total Juvenile Court Complaints for Any Offense
 
34,147
27,942 26,795  

Source: Iowa Division of Criminal and Juvenile Justice Planning - State of Iowa Annual Juvenile Delinquency Report

2. Alcohol Use Reported by Youth

Percent of youth who reported
they had not had a drink of alcohol in the past 30 days.
6th
8th
11th
Weighted
State
1999
94%
79%
52%
74%
2002 95% 82% 57% 77%
2005 96% 86% 60% 80%
2008 95% 85% 64% 81%

Source: Iowa Department of Public Health, 1999, 2002, 2005, and 2008 Iowa Youth Survey Trend Report

3. Suicide Risk Avoidance

Percent of youth reporting they did not
consider, plan, or try to commit suicide.
6th
8th
11th
Weighted
State
1999
94%
89%
86%
89%
2002 94% 89% 84% 89%
2005 96% 90% 86% 90%
2008 95% 90% 88% 91%

Source: Iowa Department of Public Health, 1999, 2002, 2005, and 2008 Iowa Youth Survey Trend Report

4. Violent Aggressive Behavior

Percent of youth reporting they did not engage in violent/aggressive behavior.
6th
8th
11th
Weighted
State
1999
89.2%
81.3%
74.3%
81.0%
2002 91.0% 84.4% 76.8% 83.8%
2005 93% 86% 80%  
2008 93% 87% 82% 87%

Source: Iowa Department of Public Health, 1999 2002, 2005, and 2008 Iowa Youth Survey Trend Report

All Youth are Prepared for Productive Adulthood

1. Disengaged Youth

16-19 year olds
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007 2008 2009  
Percentage who are not in school and not a HS graduate.
6.5%
3.3%
6.7%
6.7%
6.4% 5.9% 5.8%  
Percentage unemployed or not in labor force 4.9% 1.5% 3.6% 3.4% 3.3% 2.7% 4.1%  

Source: U.S. Census (Iowa data) - American Community Survey

2. Civic Engagement

Percent of youth who report that
they help others 5+ hours/wk
6th
8th
11th
Weighted State
1999
6%
8%
12%
8%
2002 5% 6% 10% 8%
2005 5% 6% 9% 6%
2008 3% 3% 5% 3%

Source: Iowa Department of Public Health, 1999, 2002, 2005, and 2008 Iowa Youth Survey

3. Work Experience

Percentage of students who reported that on average during the school year, they spent more than five hours working in a paid job.
6th
8th 11th Weighted State
1999
7%
11% 62% 27%
2002 6% 8% 59% 23%
2005 5% 6% 48%  
2008 3% 5% 47% 19%

Source: Iowa Department of Public Health, 1999, 2002 2005, and 2008 Iowa Youth Survey Trend Report

4. Teen Birth Rate

Birth Rate for females age 18 and younger
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
Age <15
25
 
 
Age 15-16 361          
Age 17-18 1,443          

Source: Iowa Department of Public Health, Vital Statistics of Iowa Annual Report

All Youth Have the Benefit of Safe and Supportive...Schools

1. Suspensions and Expulsions

2004 2005 2006 2007
2008
2009
2010
# of out of school suspensions
n/a 11,275 28,702 29,173 28,415
27,616
 
# of expulsions n/a 110 155 139 156 158  

Source: Iowa Department of Education, Basic Educational Data Survey, Annual Condition of Education Report

2. Supportive School Staff and Students

Percent of youth who report school staff and students are supportive.
6th
8th
11th
Weighted State
1999
59.8%
35.4%
21.5%
38.1%
2002 62% 39% 26.4% 41.9%
2005 62% 40% 30%  
2008 60% 40% 33% 44%

Source: Iowa Department of Public Health, 1999, 2002, 2005, and 2008 Iowa Youth Survey Trend Report

3. Positive Peer Norms

Percent of youth reporting positive student norms.
6th
8th
11th
Weighted State
1999
94%
78%
38.3%
68.8%
2002 94.7% 80.1% 41.9% 71.7%
2005 95% 82% 43%  
2008 94% 82% 47% 74%

Source: Iowa Department of Public Health, 1999, 2002, 2005, and 2008 Iowa Youth Survey Trend Report

4. Youth Perception of School Climate

Percent of youth reporting they "feel safe" at school.
6th
8th
11th
Weighted State
1999
86%
76%
79%
81%
2002 88% 81% 81% 84%
2005 80% 81% 82% 81%
2008 88% 81% 82% 84%

Source: Iowa Department of Public Health, 1999, 2002, 2005 and 2008 Iowa Youth Survey Trend Report

Families

1. Incidence of Child Abuse (founded rate)

2004
2005
2006
2007 2008
Cases confirmed as abuse/neglect,
children ages 0-17
7756
7521
 
7941
11496
               6,141

Source: Iowa Department of Human Services, Statewide Tracking of Child Abuse Reports (STAR)

2. Child Welfare System Involvement

Incidences of Founded Child Abuse*
2003 2004
2005
2006
2007 2008
Mental Injury
31 40 21
31
25
33
Child Prostitution 4 1 1
n/a
n/a n/a
Manufacturing Meth 400 299 128
179
68
110
Sexual Abuse 1,189 1,110 847
922
 753
636
Physical Abuse 2,797 2,523 2,009
2,154
1,847
1,774
Denial of Critical Care 12,176 12,088 11,958
16,708
15,576
13,005
Presence of Illegal Drugs 1,502 1,713 1,354
1,882
1,310
633

Source: Iowa Department of Human Services - Child Abuse Statistics
*The count is for each type of abuse. One child could suffer multiple types of abuse.

3. Family Support

Percent of youth reporting their families are involved with them and supportive
6th
8th
11th
Weighted State
1999
67.8%
66.5%
50.7%
60.8%
2002 65.3% 65% 52.1% 60.3%
2005 78% 73% 58%  
2008        

Source: Iowa Department of Public Health, 1999, 2002, 2005 and 2008 Iowa Youth Survey Trend Report

4. Defined Familial Boundaries

Percent of youth reporting that their families provide them with boundaries
6th
8th
11th
Weighted State
1999
84.8%
79%
72.3%
78.2%
2002 86.4% 79.5% 74.1% 79.7%
2005 85% 81% 76%  
2008 95% 91% 87% 91%

Source: Iowa Department of Public Health, 1999, 2002, 2005 and 2008 Iowa Youth Survey Trend Report

Communities

1. Arrests

2004
2005
2006
2007
2008 2009

Adult Arrests

96,547
104,444
97,599
99,690 96,126 96,089
Juvenile Arrests 21,513 21,221 21,688 23,091 21,001 19,144

Source: Iowa Department of Public Safety, Uniform Crime Reports

2. People in Poverty

Percentage of Iowans in Poverty
2000
2001
2002
2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008
2009

All Families

7.0%
7.0%
7.7%
6.9% 6.8% 7.5% 7.3% 7.4% 7.3%
7.7%
People Under 18 13.2% 12.5% 14.1% 12.1% 12.4% 14% 13.7% 13.6% 14.4% 15.7%

Source: U.S. Census Bureau-American Community Survey

2. Unemployment Rate

  2005 2006
2007
2008 2009

Unemployment Rate

4.3%
3.7%
3.7%
4.4%
6.0%

Source: Iowa Workforce Development

3. Safe Neighborhoods

Percent of youth who report that
their neighborhoods are safe.
6th
8th
11th
Weighted State
1999
80.1%
79.3%
81.2%
79.9%
2002 78.5% 77.5% 79% 78.2%
2005 79% 78% 78% 78.2%
2008 79% 78.7% 81.7% 79.7%

Source: Iowa Department of Public Health, 1999, 2002, 2005, and 2008 Iowa Youth Survey Trend Report

3. Supportive Neighborhoods

Percent of youth reporting that
their neighborhoods are supportive
6th
8th
11th
Weighted State
1999
58.8%
42.5%
30.4%
42.7%
2002 57.3% 43.6% 32.8% 43.8%
2005 58.9% 45% 37% 46.3%
2008 56.1% 43.2% 36.6% 44.9%

Source: Iowa Department of Public Health, 1999, 2002 2005 and 2008 Iowa Youth Survey Trend Report